Lamprey harvest

Gosia Wozniacka AP PHOTOS, AP STORIES

OREGON CITY — They dove into the cold waters, emerging with writhing, eel-like fish in hand and thrusting them into nets.

Thus began Northwest Native American tribes’ annual lamprey harvest at a rushing, 40-foot waterfall about 15 miles south of Portland. The jawless, gray fish are a traditional food source for tribal members in the Columbia River Basin… Read More

In this Friday, June 12, 2015 photo, Native Americans catch lamprey, eel-like fish, at Willamette Falls, a 40-foot waterfall south of Portland, Oregon. An ancient fish that's a source of food for tribes in the Pacific Northwest, lampreys have been in drastic decline in recent decades. (AP/Gosia Wozniacka)

In this Friday, June 12, 2015 photo, Native Americans catch lamprey, eel-like fish, at Willamette Falls, south of Portland, Oregon. An ancient fish that’s a source of food for tribes in the Pacific Northwest, lampreys have been in drastic decline in recent decades. (AP/Gosia Wozniacka)

(AP/Gosia Wozniacka)

Tribes Lamprey Harvest

In this Friday, June 12, 2015 photo, Native Americana catch lamprey, eel-like fish, at Willamette Falls near Oregon City. An ancient fish that's a source of food for tribes in the Pacific Northwest, lampreys have been in drastic decline in recent decades. (AP/Gosia Wozniacka)

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Tribes Lamprey Harvest

Tribes Lamprey Harvest

In this Friday, June 12, 2015 photo, a Native American fisherman passes a burlap sack full of lampreys, eel-like fish, at the rocks at Willamette Falls, a 40-foot waterfall south of Portland, Oregon. Northwest Native American tribes began harvesting the lampreys this week.(AP/Gosia Wozniacka)

In this Friday, June 12, 2015 photo, a Native American fisherman passes a burlap sack full of lampreys, eel-like fish, at the rocks at Willamette Falls, a 40-foot waterfall south of Portland, Oregon. (AP/Gosia Wozniacka)

 

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