Gosia Wozniacka
journalist

Gosia-WebPortraitGosia (Małgorzata) Wozniacka is a reporter, photographer, and multimedia producer. Currently she’s a freelancer based in Eastern Europe. Until the end of January, she worked for five years as a staff reporter for The Associated Press in the U.S. She also shot photos and occasionally video for the AP. Wozniacka specializes in reporting about immigration policy, Latinos and other immigrants and refugees, agriculture, and environmental issues. But she loves every good story, no matter the subject. She has also done international reporting from Poland, Belarus, Mexico and India, with focus on political, economic and social transition. She’s fascinated with borderlands, dualities, people and places whose identities lie “in-between.” Wozniacka is fluent in English, Spanish, French and Polish.

Prior to joining the AP, Wozniacka was the Immigration/Latino Affairs reporter for The Oregonian, a large U.S. daily newspaper, where she won the Best of the West, Blethen, and Society of Professional Journalists awards for her coverage. She has also written for The Dallas Morning News, The Hartford Courant, The San Francisco Chronicle, The WorldPaper, Gazeta Wyborcza (Poland’s biggest daily), and Transitions Online (a magazine that covers the former communist countries of Europe and Central Asia).

Wozniacka was born in Poland, when it was still a communist country. Her family became refugees in France when she was 12 years old, just a year before the Germans dismantled the Berlin Wall.  Two years later, unable to stop moving, the family immigrated once again to the United States. Wozniacka has studied and worked on both continents, and is often on the road between the two. She received her Master’s degree from the Graduate School of Journalism at UC Berkeley. For several years, Wozniacka trained high school students at The Oregonian’s summer Journalism Institute in reporting, writing, and multimedia skills. She has taught journalism and writing in the Urban Scholars Program at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. She loves to read literature from around the world and has also taught a series of non-fiction writing workshops in Portland.

A note about my name: Małgorzata is my full name, and I like it very much. But it’s unpronounceable to most people in the United States. My job relies on sources calling me and people feeling comfortable talking with me. So I use Gosia, a diminutive of Małgorzata, as my pen name. Sometimes I also go by Margarita.